Lying is Still Bad

In the long fought BitTorrent infringement case of Malibu Media v. Tashiro, (S.D. Indiana) the court appears to be close to closing this case with a resolution in favor of Malibu Media. As with just about every other case that has gone through substantive proceedings, the results appear to be either a finding of infringement, or defendants who lie and destroy evidence, resulting in a verdict in favor of the plaintiff.

This case, fought longer and harder than most, has resulting in a few extra points, one being with respect to a long fight about Plaintiff’s expert Patrick Page and efforts to discredit Mr. Paige. Curiously, these seem to have backfired as the court found Plaintiff’s expert Mr. Paige more credible than the expert offered by Defendants.

Based on the relative credentials of the parties’ experts, the Court concludes that Patrick Paige’s testimony is more accurate and more credible. As such, the Court finds it highly likely that thousands of files were deleted and were unrecoverable. This confirms that Defendant Charles did not temporarily delete relevant evidence; instead, he permanently destroyed that evidence. As a result, Charles is liable for spoliation.

But the real substance of this case relates to a husband and wife who the court found lied and destroyed evidence. Much has been written on this case about the lack of evidence, but the heart of the case deals with why the evidence was missing. As summarized by the Court:

Discovery in the federal system is intended “make a trial less a game of blind man’s bluff and more a fair contest with the basic issues and facts disclosed to the fullest practicable extent.” United States v. Procter & Gamble Co., 356 U.S. 677, 682 (1958) (emphasis added). The rules governing discovery contemplate that parties will “obtain the fullest possible knowledge of the issues and facts before trial,” such that “civil trials in the federal courts no longer need be carried on in the dark.” Hickman v. Taylor, 329 U.S. 495, 501 (1947).

[Defendant’s] conduct is simply not consistent with these principles. By deleting files from the Stover drive, [Defendant] chose to conceal—not disclose—potentially relevant information. And by doing so, [Defendant] deprived Plaintiff of the ability to gain the “fullest possible knowledge” of the facts relevant to Plaintiff’s underlying copyright claim. [Defendant] thus flouted the important principles underpinning litigation carried on before this Court and other courts in the federal system, and his decision to do so cannot go unpunished.

In this case it was more than just the husband that got in trouble, but the Court specifically found the wife at fault as well.

[Defendant Wife’s] own testimony thus demonstrates that she repeatedly failed to discharge her duty to reasonably investigate whether her discovery responses were complete and accurate, and sanctions against [Defendant Wife] are therefore appropriate.

Additionally, [Defendant Wife’s] failure to investigate was especially egregious in light of her attorney’s representations to the contrary. … These misrepresentations are hardly consistent with a party’s duties to investigate and disclose relevant facts, confirming that sanctions against [Defendant Wife] are appropriate.

In essence, the court found the husband-wife team acted together on many fronts and they were liable for the bad acts of the other.  Protecting a family member may seem like a good idea, there are consequences when doing so involves lying or hiding evidence.

Based on these considerations, the Court concludes that the [Defendants] have the sort of “close family relationship,” Sebastian, 2008 WL 2875255, at *33, that would support extending a Fifth Amendment adverse inference from one party to another. Thus, when Plaintiff’s counsel asked whether [Defendant] had agreed with his wife to hide the truth in this case, the Court may infer that [Defendant] refused to answer not only to protect himself, but also to protect his wife.

And while the court found also fault with the Defendants’ attorney, he managed to escape without sanctions.

[Defendant’s attorney’s] conduct in this case borders on sanctionable. …. In these circumstances, the Court will exercise its discretion to refrain from sanctioning [Defendant’s attorney].

In summation, the court found the Defendants guilty of perjury with respect to hiding evidence, hiding hard drives and lying about the use of BitTorrent and directed that both husband and wife be found liable under Plaintiff’s claims.

Here, the Court finds by clear and convincing evidence that Defendants have engaged in a similar pattern of misconduct. Defendants spoiled evidence, committed perjury, and failed to discharge their duties to conduct discovery reasonably and in good faith. They lied to the opposing party; they withheld the existence of material evidence; and they deleted potentially damaging computer files the very night before they were to relinquish such files for discovery. Just as in the cases cited above, this extensive pattern of conduct warrants the harshest of sanctions, and the Magistrate Judge accordingly recommends that the Court enter default judgment against both Defendants.

Based on the long record of this case and likely hundreds of thousands in attorney fees, this may result in one of the most significant awards against defendants in any BitTorrent litigation.

 

The case and relevant opinion: Malibu Media, LLC v. Tashiro, et al. 1:13-cv-00205, (S.D. Indiana, May 18, 2015)

 

4 Thoughts on “Lying is Still Bad

  1. Raul on May 20, 2015 at 1:13 am said:

    The reference to “hundreds of thousands in attorney’s fees” seem to indicate that the writer of this post has inside information regarding this lawsuit from the plaintiff’s camp. If so, is it ethical for a lawyer to blog about her/his ongoing litigation without a disclaimer and/or a disclosure as to the identity of the writer? Who are you? If you represent Malibu Media it would seem that you should refrain from commenting at this stage of the litigation or, at least, disclose you identity/interest.

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